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Come home with more good food than you know what to do with? Interested in trying something new and different with market produce? Check out our recipe index for some new ideas! Have a recipe you'd like to share? Email us at svgmarket@gmail.com.

Thursday, September 29, 2011

News from the SVGM - September 30th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 30th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Well, here we are at the very end of September for the Growers' Market, with just a month of autumn weather to see us out for the 2011 season. Now is the time to think about stocking up the freezer with local, sustainable meats for winter-long enjoyment; to remember to pick up enough local, organic whole-wheat flour for baking; and to ask our vendors how to find them once the weather's no longer suitable for an outdoor market. Several of our vendors offer winter deliveries, or make their products available through a number of local businesses. Don't forget to ask!

Rain or shine, our vendors will be at the market, but these rainy days call for food that's warm, filling, and comforting. It might not be cold out yet, but there's nothing quite like a hot bowl of soup to chase away the damp. Looking in the direction of Japan for this week's recipes, we have a Japanese Chicken Noodle Soup, a far Eastern version of the classic dish. All around the world, there are variations on chicken noodle, and this one reflects the simple elegance that informs Japanese cuisine. More familiar, perhaps, but just as Japanese, is a recipe for Salmon Teriyaki, which uses a simple but delicious marinade and glaze to complement the fish's natural richness.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 30th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Salmon Teriyaki

Adapted from The Cook's Encyclopedia of Japanese Cooking by Emi Kazuko (Barnes & Noble, 2003)
Serves 4

Salmon teriyaki may well be one of the best-known Japanese dishes in the West. A sweetened mix of soy sauce and sake marinates, then glazes salmon fillets, which take on an appealing glossy brown shine. It's an excellent first step into Japanese food for novices who might be put off by the notion of raw fish in nigiri sushi, or find themselves lost amid the sometimes bewildering array of ingredients that are common to people half a world away.

Much of Japanese cuisine is quite seasonal, with vegetables often simply prepared to let their freshness shine. Serve this salmon with an array of fresh autumn vegetables, especially if you can find a bright mix of colors for the plate.

Ingredients:
  • Four salmon fillet portions, about 5 oz. each, skin on
  • 3 tbsp. soy sauce
  • 3 tbsp. sake
  • 3 tbsp. mirin
  • 2 tbsp. sugar
Directions:
  1. Mix together the soy sauce, sake, mirin, and half of the sugar, and pour over the salmon in a shallow dish. Cover and marinate for 30 minutes.

  2. Preheat a broiler. Remove the salmon from the marinade, and pat dry with paper towels. Reserve the marinade that remains in the dish. Place the fillets on a lightly oiled broiling pan or baking sheet, and place under the heat. Cook for about 6 minutes, until the edges begin to turn golden. If necessary, check the level of doneness with a thin knife. The fish should be slightly underdone to your taste, as it will return to the broiler briefly when glazed.

  3. Meanwhile, heat the marinade in a saucepan, adding the remaining tablespoon of sugar. Bring just to a boil, and remove from the heat. Brush the salmon with the glaze, and return to the broiler just until the surface begins to bubble. Serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Just about anywhere you go, there's a local style of chicken - and often chicken noodle - soup. It's the perfect comfort food, the sort that moms make for kids the world over. Japan is no exception, and we've dug up a recipe for Japanese Chicken Noodle Soup, which is both familiar and intriguingly unique to Western eyes. Try making it yourself, or adapt a few tricks to fit your own favorite recipe, and let a warm bowl of soup chase away the autumn chill.

Bonus Recipe, September 30th: Japanese Chicken Noodle Soup

Seasonal Recipe
Japanese Chicken Noodle Soup

Adapted from Japanese Home Style Cooking by Better Home Japan (Better Home Publishing House, 1986)
Serves 4

There are as many versions of chicken soup as there are cooks, and this one from Japan has its own unique twists on the familiar. In keeping with the Japanese style of artfully arranged dishes, everything is carefully composed in a bowl before adding the hot broth. Ingredients are chosen for their color and appearance as much as taste. If you are unable to find certain ingredients, then simply adapt what you have on hand, as well as what's in season.

Dashi stock is made from kombu kelp and dried bonito fish flakes; you may also find a bouillon-like version in ethnic markets. If you can't find it, a light chicken stock is the best, easiest replacement. Udon noodles are a type of thick, slightly stretchy wheat noodle. They're excellent in soup, as they have a texture and presence all their own, but any long, thick noodle will do. Kamaboko, a type of fish surimi, may be the toughest to find. Just skip it if you don't have anything similar.

Ingredients:

  • ¾ lb. dried udon noodles
  • 4 small shiitake mushrooms
  • 4 oz. chicken breast meat
  • 1 inch length carrot
  • 4 oz. spinach, chard, or other greens
  • 2 eggs
  • 2-inch piece kamaboko, cut into 4 pieces (optional)
  • 5 cups dashi stock
  • 6 tbsp. soy sauce
  • 5 tbsp. mirin
  • 1 tbsp. sake
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Prepare the dashi stock, and season with the soy sauce and 4 tbsp. mirin. Keep warm while preparing the rest of the soup.

  2. Simmer the shiitake mushrooms in water or extra dashi stock until tender. If very large, cut the caps in halves or quarters. Trim the chicken into thin bite-size pieces, and cook in a covered saucepan with the sake, until just cooked through. Add more liquid if necessary, to prevent sticking and browning.

  3. Cut the carrot into 8 thin slices. If you have a small cookie cutter, you can cut the slices into flower or leaf shapes. Boil the slices for 1 minute in salted water to soften. Boil the spinach in the same water, until it just begins to wilt. Rinse with cold water, squeeze dry, and trim into inch-long pieces.

  4. Whisk the eggs with the remaining mirin and salt. Cook in a lightly greased nonstick skillet, until the egg has set into a flat omelet. Cut into 4 pieces.

  5. Cook the udon in plenty of boiling water until soft; the noodles should be more tender than traditional Italian pasta. Drain. Place the noodles in the bottom of 4 soup bowls, and arrange the soup ingredients over the top, making sure that all of the bright colors and shapes are visible. Pour the hot broth over everything, and serve immediately.

Thursday, September 22, 2011

News from the SVGM - September 23rd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 23rd, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
Autumn is here at the Growers' Market, with the days growing cooler and shorter as we move into the last few weeks of the 2011 season. We'll be out at Ard's every Friday afternoon through the end of October, which no longer seems all that far away! The colors of summer are disappearing, as the tomatoes and peppers give their last gasps before the first frosts end it all until next year.

Though the weather and changing seasons are taking their toll on summer's vegetables, now's the time to start enjoying the reappearance of cold-weather crops. Lettuce and other salad greens are happier now than in the summer's heat, and now the broccoli plants are bursting forth with giant green heads. When the weather turns cold, they turn sweet; it's something those California-grown brassicas in the grocery store never do. Turn some of those florets into a hearty and filling Wheat Berry and Broccoli Salad, as a fine side dish for an autumn meal. Or, should the weather turn gray and chilly, as it's bound to again, cook it up with a bit of cheddar and creaminess in a Broccoli Gratin with Cheddar Cheese.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 23rd, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Wheat Berry and Broccoli Salad

Adapted from How To Cook Everything Vegetarian by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 2007)
Serves 4

Salads don't need to be lettuce-based; hearty grain salads, which can accommodate a wide range of ingredients, make for excellent main or side dishes. Here, it's wheat berries with broccoli and walnuts, but a range of alternatives work as well. Cauliflower's especially good here, and the addition of a little extra sweetness or savory punch, like plumped raisins, shredded cheddar cheese, or crisp, crumbled bacon, would be welcome, too.

Wheat berries can take a while to cook, but there are ways to speed up the process. Soaking the grains overnight drastically reduces the cooking time, just like when cooking up dried beans. You can also cook them in a pressure cooker, which is a fantastic time-saver if you have one.

Ingredients:
  • 2 cups cooked wheat berries
  • 3 cups broccoli, finely chopped
  • ½ cup walnuts, chopped
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • ½ cup parsley, chopped
  • 3 tbsp. olive oil
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a large, dry skillet over medium heat, toast the walnuts until just fragrant. Remove the nuts from the pan, wipe out any bits of walnut skin, and put the pan back on the heat. Add the olive oil to the pan, and when hot, add the onion. Cook, stirring, until softened.

  2. Add the broccoli to the pan, and stir frequently, until it begins to brown at the edges and is tender. Add the wheat berries, and stir to combine, just a minute or two, and turn out into a bowl. Stir in the parsley, and adjust the seasoning. Serve warm or at room temperature.
* * * * *

On The Website
A gratin is a wonderful thing, a simple casserole that's got a bit of creaminess, a bit of crunch, and makes for a wonderful dinner side dish. Turn some of this week's fine, fresh broccoli into a Broccoli Gratin with Cheddar Cheese, which turns the old-fashioned version of cheddar cheese melted on top of broccoli into something a little fancier - but still ooey, gooey, and wonderful.

Bonus Recipe, September 23rd: Broccoli Gratin with Cheddar Cheese

Seasonal Recipe
Broccoli Gratin with Cheddar Cheese

Adapted from The Joy of Cooking by Irma S. Rombauer (Scribner, 1997)
Serves 4 to 6

Broccoli and cheddar cheese: they're really quite good together. How many kids grew up devouring broccoli under a melted orange - sometimes just cheese-like, perhaps - topping, but unwilling to touch it in its treelike, plain green state? Try upping the ante a bit, adding a roux-thickened Bechamel sauce, enriched with cheddar cheese, and topping with fresh breadcrumbs that brown and crisp int the oven. It's soft and rich with melted cheese, topped with a great crunch for contrast. Served with something homey and reassuring, like a roast chicken, it's the perfect rustic elegance.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons of toasted fresh breadcrumbs
  • ¼ cup fresh breadcrumbs (untoasted)
  • 2 lbs. broccoli, stems and florets cut into pieces
  • 1-¼ cup milk
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, plus more as needed
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup grated cheddar cheese
  • A few drops white wine or lemon juice, as needed
  • Salt and white pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 425°F. Blanch the broccoli in salted, boiling water until just tender, about 4 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold water.

  2. In a saucepan over medium heat, melt 2 tablespoons of the butter. When it stops foaming, add the flour, stirring occasionally until the roux becomes fragrant, but not darkened, about 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and whisk in the milk, and place the sauce over medium heat to bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat and cook, without boiling, until it thickens up like a thick cream soup. Add in the cheese and stir. If it becomes stringy, add a little white wine or lemon juice, and remove from the heat. Season with salt and pepper.

  3. Butter a 2-quart casserole or gratin dish, and sprinkle the bottom with the toasted breadcrumbs. Fold the cooked broccoli into the saucepan with the cheese sauce, and pour in the dish. Top with the remaining butter, cut into small pieces, and the untoasted breadcrumbs. Bake until the sauce is bubbly and it's beginning to brown up nicely, about 20 minutes. Serve immediately.

Thursday, September 15, 2011

News from the SVGM - September 16th

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 16th, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
So much rain! Although last week's flooding caused no small amount of trouble, we'll be back at Ard's this Friday for the Growers' Market! Excessive rain and floods took a toll on some of the crops and animals at our vendors' farms, and with more rain the day before market, our growers aren't able to offer much insight into what you can expect to find this week. It'll be a surprise come Friday, but seeing as this is peak season for market selection, there are bound to be some great things!

Without much advance notice to guide us, we're shooting from the hip with this week's recipes. Think warm, dry thoughts, and keep toasty indoors with Pork with Apples and Cream. Or steer more to the hot, fragrant, and restorative with a spicy (if you like) Thai Beef and Cabbage Soup. It'll take the edge off of a damp and dark day.

Looking for a great day out with the family? Bella's Gardens will be throwing their own AppleFest this Saturday, September 17th, from 10am to 5pm at the orchard. In addition to apple picking, of course, you can expect hayrides, food, music, kids' activities, and an apple dessert contest. Stop by the market stand this week, or drop by the Bella's Gardens website. You can find their orchard half a mile west of Kratzerville on Route 204.

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 16th, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Pork with Apples and Cream

Adapted from Jane Grigson's Fruit Book by Jane Grigson (University of Nebraska Press, 2007)
Serves 6 to 8

This is a classic dish from Normandy, on the northern French coast, where apples and pork are plentiful. Pheasant is another traditional meat often used here, though a farm-fresh chicken is a fine alternative. This version, which makes use of slices of pork for speed and ease of cooking, is readily adaptable. You can certainly use a whole bone-in loin, or other cut of pork, by roasting the meat after browning, then making the sauce from the roasting juices. Be sure to remove any excess fat before reducing the sauce, to keep it from becoming greasy.

You can use regular butter, rather than clarified butter for this recipe, but take great care not to let it burn. Clarified butter, which has been gently melted and strained to remove the milk solids that can brown and burn, requires less careful attention, but still has great flavor. Alternately, use olive oil.

Ingredients:
  • 2 pork tenderloins, or 6-8 thick slices of pork loin
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 1/3 cup calvados, applejack, or other apple brandy
  • 1-½ tbsp. flour
  • 2 cups dry (hard) cider, or white wine
  • 1 cup chicken stock
  • 1/3 cup sour cream
  • 1/3 cup heavy cream
  • 3 large apples
  • 1-½ tbsp. sugar
  • Lemon juice
  • Clarified butter
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. Cut the pork tenderloins (if using) thickly on the diagonal. Season with salt and pepper, and if you have time, allow to rest for several hours or overnight in the refrigerator. In a large pan with a lid, over medium heat, soften the onion in the clarified butter. Push the cooked onions to the side and brown the pork slices on both sides. Don't crowd the pieces; use two pans if necessary.

  2. Add the apple brandy to the pan, and cook for a few moments to evaporate a good bit of the alcohol. Sprinkle the flour all over, and after a moment's cooking, deglaze with the cider and stock. Lower the heat, cover the pan, and simmer until the pork is tender. Tenderloin will take only a few minutes; pork loin 10 to 15, depending on thickness. Turn the pieces occasionally to ensure even cooking. Remove the pork when cooked, and keep warm.

  3. Reduce the cooking liquid by half, or until the flavor is suitably concentrated. Exactly how much will depend on how much it has already reduced during the cooking. Stir in the cream, and season to taste with salt, pepper, and lemon juice. When ready, pour over the pork slices.

  4. While the pork cooks, peel, core, and slice the apples thinly. Fry the apple slices in butter, until lightly brown at the edges and tender, but not mushy. Sprinkle the sugar over the top, and turn the apples to allow the sugar to caramelize all over. Garnish the pork with the apples, and serve immediately.
* * * * *

On The Website
Cabbage is a versatile vegetable, even if not always the marquee star. It's an excellent ingredient in soups all around the world, from the hearty winter stews of northern Europe to a curry-like Thai Beef and Cabbage Soup. This one brings different flavors, from half a world away, to season up some of the basic ingredients of the winter larder. Mild or spicy, it's a richly flavored and fragrant dish to chase away the damp and cold of a rainy day.

Bonus Recipe, September 16th: Thai Beef and Cabbage Soup

Seasonal Recipe
Thai Beef and Cabbage Soup

Adapted from Asian Soups by Suzie Smith (Lansdowne, 2000)
Serves 4

Cabbage may not be the sexiest of vegetables, but it's inexpensive, long-lasting, nutritious, and quite versatile. Think of it as a vegetable that likes to play well with others. Where a European tradition might take beef and cabbage, and enrich them with butter and cream, and season with spices like caraway seed, this alternate take uses the flavors of Thai curries to chase off a wintry chill.

The basic recipe here is quite mild, but can easily be adjusted to accommodate your preference for heat and spice.

Ingredients:

  • 1 lb. chuck steak, cut into 1-inch cubes
  • 3 cups shredded white or Chinese cabbage
  • 3 or 4 small red chilli peppers
  • 4 shallots, peeled
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 tbsp. fresh ginger, chopped
  • ½ cup fresh cilantro
  • 2 tbsp. lime zest
  • 1 tsp. coriander
  • 1 tsp. cumin
  • ½ tsp. black pepper
  • ¼ tsp. turmeric
  • ¼ cup peanut oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 4 medium tomatoes, chopped
  • 1 tbsp. fish sauce
  • 6 cups beef stock
  • 2 cups coconut milk
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Combine the chilli peppers, shallots, garlic, ginger, cilantro, lime zest, coriander, cumin, black pepper, and turmeric in a food processor, and process to a smooth paste.

  2. Heat a large saucepan over medium heat, and add the peanut oil. When it shimmers, add the spice paste, and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes. Add the onion and beef to the pot, with extra oil if necessary, and cook until the onion is softened and the beef is browned all over. Add the stock, coconut milk, tomatoes, and fish sauce, and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer, and cook until the beef is tender, about an hour and a half.

  3. Stir in the cabbage and continue to cook until the cabbage is tender, about 10 minutes. Check the seasoning, and serve immediately.

Thursday, September 8, 2011

SVGM - September 9th - CANCELLED

Due to our concerns over flooding, accessibility, and general safety for all involved, the Growers' Market has been cancelled for Friday, September 9th. If there are any further updates, we will post them on our Facebook page. We hope to be back next Friday, as usual.

Thursday, September 1, 2011

News from the SVGM - September 2nd

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 2nd, 2011

In this week's email:

  • News From The Market
  • Seasonal Recipe
  • On The Website
* * * * *

News From The Market
September's here, and it looks like a pleasant afternoon for this week's Growers' Market! It's Labor Day weekend, and you can expect plenty of fine local meats and produce to pick up for that Monday cookout: grass-fed beef for hamburgers; sweet Italian sausages from delicious local pork; fingerling potatoes just perfect for potato salad; juicy, ripe tomatoes; sweet corn; sweet watermelon and cantaloupe; and more!

Hamburgers on the grill may be the beef-based standard for summer and fall holidays, but there are plenty of other fine cuts to enjoy from the cow. We have two different recipes this week, using two different cuts. One is quick and easy; the other takes time, but most of it unattended. Both are delicious, and worth considering if the weather postpones the picnic. Short Ribs with Potatoes and Mustard is a simple braise, and one best made a day ahead and reheated; Sichuan Beef with Peppers is a lightning-fast Chinese stir-fry.

This coming week, Bucknell University's Environmental Center is kicking off a film series at Lewisburg's renovated Campus Theatre with "Fresh," an independent documentary film about America's ailing food system and the innovative community farmers who are providing healthier alternatives. After the film, there will be a panel discussion on sustainable agriculture with the film's director.

"Fresh" screens Tuesday, September 6th at 7pm at the Campus Theatre (413 Market St., Lewisburg). It's open to the general public, and admission is just $2. You can find more information on the theatre's website, http://www.campustheatre.org/, or by contacting Wendy Chou (wc013@bucknell.edu).

Pass the newsletter along! If you've received a copy from a friend, and would like to get one each week during the market season, send an email to: svgmarket@gmail.com

Susquehanna Valley Growers' Market
September 2nd, 2011
2pm - 6pm
Ard's Farm Market
4803 Old Turnpike Rd, Lewisburg
(Between Lewisburg and Mifflinburg, on PA 45)
Visit our website at http://growersmarket.blogspot.com/
Check us out on Facebook

* * * * *

Seasonal Recipe
Short Ribs with Potatoes and Mustard

Adapted from How To Cook Everything by Mark Bittman (Wiley, 1997)
Serves 4

Short ribs can be tough, but, like most tough muscles, have a great deal of flavor. Braising is a great way to tackle this problem, as the long, moist cooking reduces the connective tissue to perfect tenderness, while turning the cooking liquid into an intensely flavored sauce. These sorts of recipes are best made ahead, as the flavors really meld as they sit in the refrigerator overnight, and you then have the opportunity to skim off any excess fat that hardens on top. Just take care not to boil the dish when reheating, which will keep the beef moist, tender, and delicious.

Ingredients:
  • 3 lb. beef short ribs
  • 2 cups onions, diced
  • 1-½ lb. fingerling or other waxy potatoes, cut in half if large
  • 1-½ cup beef stock (or water), plus more as needed
  • 2 tbsp. Dijon mustard
  • 2 tbsp. neutral cooking oil
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
Directions:
  1. In a Dutch oven, or another large, heavy pot with a lid, heat the oil over medium-high heat. In batches, brown the short ribs well on all sides, taking care not to burn them. Set the ribs aside as you finish, and pour off any excess fat. Keep enough to cook the onions.

  2. Reduce the heat to medium, and cook the onions, stirring, until soft and beginning to brown. Add the stock, and return the ribs to the pot. Bring up to a boil, then cover and put on low heat. Stir from time to time, and add extra liquid if it begins to fry out.

  3. After 30 minutes, add the potatoes to the mix. Check and turn the meat about every 15 minutes or so; it will take at least another 30 minutes before the meat is tender. If the potatoes finish early, remove them with a slotted spoon. When everything is cooked, remove the meat and potatoes from the stew, and skim the fat from the braising liquid. (This is easiest if you can let it chill in the refrigerator overnight.) Reheat everything together gently, stirring the mustard into the liquid just before serving.
* * * * *

On The Website
Stir-fries are quick, simple dishes, and ideal for an easy weekday night meal. Most, like in this recipe for Sichuan Beef with Peppers, use a few simple but flavorful (and colorful!) ingredients to make a meal on short notice.

Bonus Recipe, September 2nd: Sichuan Beef with Peppers

Seasonal Recipe
Sichuan Beef with Peppers

Adapted from Land of Plenty by Fuschia Dunlop (W.W. Norton, 2001)
Serves 2

Served with plain white rice, this can be a simple dinner for two that takes less time to prepare than the rice. You can also serve it as one dish among several, for a bigger crowd or for a fancier meal. If you decide to scale up the portions, though, take care not to crowd the pan, which can keep the stir-fry from cooking properly - everything steams instead of browning.

Ingredients:

  • ½ lb. lean beef, such as flank steak
  • ½ red bell pepper
  • ½ green bell pepper
  • 2 tsp. Shaoxing wine, or sherry
  • 1 tbsp. plus ¾ tsp. cornstarch
  • 2 tsp. water
  • ½ tbsp. soy sauce
  • 3 tbsp. chicken stock
  • Peanut oil, for cooking
  • Salt, to taste
Directions:
  1. Cut the beef against the grain into thin strips, and place in a bowl with the Shaoxing wine, 1 tbsp. cornstarch, the water, and salt. Meanwhile, slice the bell peppers into thin strips like the beef. In a small bowl, combine the stock, the remaining constarch, and the soy sauce.

  2. Heat a wok, or a large skillet, over medium-high heat. Add about a tablespoon of oil, and stir-fry the peppers for a minute or two, until they are just cooked. Remove them from the wok, and add the beef, with more peanut oil if necessary. Stir constantly to keep the pieces separate. When the pieces are starting to brown well, add the peppers back, and stir for a moment before adding the soy-stock mix. Stir until the mixture thickens - just a few seconds! - and remove to a serving dish. Serve immediately.